Money Talks – May 19, 2018

This week on “Money Talks,” John Dickson, C.P.A., CVA, CFP®, joins Troy Harmon, CFA, CVA, and K.C. Smith, CFP®, to discuss the previous week’s University of Michigan Consumer Sentiment Survey as well as this week’s Retail Sales and Industrial Production. John shares with the hosts some unique tax opportunities for Georgia residents: Georgia Film Credits and Georgia’s Rural Hospital Tax Credit. He explains the benefits of applying for tax credits and how the Rural Hospital Tax Credit can also qualify for a charitable deduction on your federal return. The experts also answer listeners’ question on putting your parent’s house in your name, stocks T-Mobile and AES Corp., and municipal bonds. They also delve into bitcoin and crypto currency and debate on what makes them disruptive.

Case Study: Direct Your State Taxes to Rural Hospitals and Receive a Charitable Donation Deduction

Tax Manager John Dickson, C.P.A., CVA, CFP®, joins Troy Harmon, CFA, CVA, and K.C. Smith, CFP®, to share some unique tax opportunities for Georgia residents: Georgia Film Credits and Georgia’s Rural Hospital Tax Credit. He explains the benefits of applying for tax credits and how the Rural Hospital Tax Credit can also qualify for a charitable deduction on your federal return.

Market Roundup: Moderate Trading as Investors Moved Away from Stocks

The Dow Jones Industrial Average kicked off the week with its eighth consecutive day of gains as trade tensions between the United States and China have eased. Both the S&P 500 Index and the NASDAQ Composite also posted gains. The ease was short-lived as Stocks slipped amid trade, growth, and geopolitical stress, closing in the red on Tuesday. Healthcare and Technology brands led the retreat. Stocks stepped up amid a variety of economic news on Wednesday, as industrial production gained 0.7% in April, marking the third consecutive monthly increase. The uptick in March was also revised higher. Meanwhile, housing starts decreased by 3.7% in April, although single-family starts were 0.1% ahead of March’s number and they are up by 10.5% from April 2017. Stocks dipped again on Thursday, while initial jobless claims increased for the week ended May 12. The Department of Labor report showed new claims climbed by 11,000 to 222,000. Indices ended mixed on Friday with the Dow closing slightly in the green. The S&P 500 and NASDAQ traded fractionally lower, weighed down by Energy and Financial sector stocks. For the week, both the Dow and S&P 500 closed the week lower, about 0.5%, while the Nasdaq fell a bit more.

Money Talks – May 12, 2018

This week on “Money Talks,” Chief Investment Officer Troy Harmon, CFA, CVA, is joined by Managing Associate Shawna Theriault, C.P.A., CFP®, CDFA®, and Senior Associate Jarrett McKenzie, CFP®, CWS®, to discuss the April employment situation, the Producer Price Index, the Consumer Price Index and wholesale trade. They also delve into geopolitical tensions with North Korea and China. Shawna and Jarrett talk about a common question for most investors, “How much life insurance should I have?” The planners’ conversation covers how life insurance protects the financial plan and can help ensure goals are met even if something unfortunate should happen. The experts also answer listeners’ questions on Ross Stores, and how one 401(k) beneficiary can and cannot share her windfall with her siblings.

Case Study: The Need for Life Insurance Is as Unique as Your Financial Plan

Managing Associate Shawna Theriault, C.P.A., CFP®, CDFA®, and Senior Associate Jarrett McKenzie, CFP®, CWS®, join Chief Investment Officer Troy Harmon, CFA, CVA, to talk about a common question for most investors, “How much life insurance should I have?” The planners’ conversation covers how life insurance protects the financial plan and can help ensure goals are met even if something unfortunate should happen.

Market Roundup: Benchmark Indices Markedly Advance for First Time in Weeks

Indices kicked off the week on a positive note Monday as Technology stocks led the advance on a variety of economic news. Strong quarterly earnings coupled with Friday’s positive employment report have boosted investor confidence in continuing economic growth. Markets closed mixed moves on Tuesday. After flat trading most of the day, the Dow Jones Industrial Average and NASDAQ Composite tacked on fractional gains while the S&P 500 index shaved a few points. According to the Producer Price Index, prices moved very little in April, up a scant 0.1% over March, when prices jumped 0.3%. In fact, the bump in prices is attributable to a 0.1% rise in the prices producers got for services—prices for goods were unchanged in April.  Stocks were back in positive territory mid-week with energy brands posting gains on a jump in crude oil prices. West Texas Intermediate crude tacked on 3.1% to settle at $71.14 a barrel. The good news continued Thursday as stocks advanced on a variety of economic news. Department of Labor data showed initial jobless claims held steady at 211,000 new claims for the second week straight. However, the Consumer Price Index rose 0.2% in April, versus a forecast for a 0.3% gain. Core prices edged up 0.1% following a 0.2% rise for the previous two months. At Friday’s close, the weekly gains were enough to push each of the indices into the black year-to-date. Furthermore, it marked the first time April 13 that the major indices had posted weekly gains exceeding 1.0%.

Money Talks – May 5, 2018

This week on “Money Talks,” our in-house Research Department takes over as Analysts Nick Antonucci, CVA, and Jacob Keen join Troy Harmon, CFA, CVA, to discuss the March Employment Situation, Personal Income, and the ISM Manufacturing and Non-manufacturing surveys. They also touch on the Federal Open Market Committee meeting on monetary policy. The Analysts take a deep look into why companies buy back their stock, and what it means for investors and the company. The hosts also answer listeners’ questions on catastrophic liability insurance policies, what is going on with Consumer Staples stocks, and what is behind the rise in Commodities.